Nos Jornais, Revistas e Blogs…


Nos Jornais, Revistas e Blogs…



Currently sorted By last update descending Sort chronologically: By last update change to ascending | By creation date

Page:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  (Next)
  ALL

Remarks in Hudson

(Last edited: sábado, 15 abril 2006, 1:50 )

Remarks in Hudson, NY

http://www.kunstler.com/


January 8, 2005
James Howard Kunstler

My last three books were concerned with the physical arrangement of life in our nation, in particular suburban sprawl, the most destructive development pattern the world has ever seen, and perhaps the greatest misallocation of resources the world has ever known.
The world - and of course the US - now faces an epochal predicament: the global oil production peak and the arc of depletion that follows. We are unprepared for this crisis of industrial civilization. We are sleepwalking into the future.

The global peak oil production event will change everything about how we live. It will challenge all of our assumptions. It will compel us to do things differently - whether we like it or not.

Nobody knows for sure when the absolute peak year of global oil production will occur. You can only tell for sure in the "rear-view mirror," seeing the data after the fact. The US oil production peak in 1970 was not really recognized until the numbers came in over the next couple of years. By 1973 it was pretty clear that US oil production was in decline - the numbers were there for anyone to see, because the US oil industry was fairly transparent. They had to report their production to regulatory agencies. And low and behold American production was going down - despite the fact that we were selling more cars and more suburban houses. Of course we had been making up for falling production by increasing our oil imports.

1973 was the yea r of the Yom Kippur War. With encouragement from the old Soviet Union, Syria and Egypt ganged up on Israel and after a rough start, Israel kicked their asses. The Islamic world was very ticked off - especially at the assistance that the US had given Israel in airlifted military equipment. So a lot of pressure was brought to bear on the leaders of the Arab oil states to punish the US and we got the famous OPEC embargo of 1973.

But it was more than that. The OPEC embargo was effective precisely because it was now recognized by everybody that the US had passed its all time oil production peak. We no longer had surplus capacity. We weren't the swing producer anymore, OPEC was. We were pumping flat-out just to stay in place, and depending on imports to make up for the rest.

That was a tectonic shift in world economics.

That's exactly when OPEC seized pricing control of the oil markets. We had a very rough decade. 20 percent interest rates. "Stagflation." High unemployment. Stock market in the toilet.

We had a second oil crisis in 1979 when the shah of Iran was overthrown. The 1970s closed on a note of desperation. Everything we did in America was tied to oil and foreigners were jerking our economy around, and it led the worst recession since the 1930s.

But we got over it and a lot of Americans drew the false conclusion that the these oil crises were a shuck and jive on the part of business and Arab oil sheiks.

How did we get over it? The oil crises of the 70s prompted a frantic era of drilling, and the last great oil discoveries came on line in the 1980s - chiefly the North Sea fields of England and Norway, and the Alaska fields of the North Slope and Prudhoe Bay. They literally saved the west's ass for 20 years. In fact, so much oil flowed out of them that the markets were glutted, and by the era of Bill Clinton, oil prices were headed down to as low as $10 a barrel.

It was all an illusion. The North Sea and Alaska are now well into depletion - they were drilled with the newest technology and - guess what - we depleted them more efficiently! England is now becoming a new oil importer again after a 20 year fiesta. The implications are very grim.

Now, some of the most knowledgeable geologists in the world believe we have reached the global oil production peak. Unlike the US oil industry, the foreign producers do not give out their production data so transparently. We may never actually see any reliable figures. The global production peak may only show up in the strange behavior of the markets.

The global peak is liable to manifest as a "bumpy plateau." Prices will wobble. Markets will wobble - as the oil markets have been doing the past year. International friction will increase, especially around the places where the oil is - and two-thirds of the world's remaining oil is in the states around the Persian Gulf where, every week, a half dozen US soldiers and many more Iraqis are getting blown up, beheaded, or shot.

The "bumpy plateau" is where all kind of market signals and political signals are telling you that "something is happening, Mr. Jones, but you don't know what it is." We'll only know in the rear-view mirror.

As of the past 12 months, Saudi Arabia seems to have lost the ability to function as 'swing producer.' The swing producer is the one with a lot of excess supply, who can just open the valves and let more oil out on the world markets, which inevitably drives the price down. Saudi Arabia has kept saying they would produce a million more barrels a day, but there's no evidence that they really have.

Well, the good news is that Saudi Arabia and OPEC can no longer set the price of oil. The bad news is that nobody can. When there is no production surplus in the world, that's a pretty good sign that the world is at peak.

Princeton Geologist Kenneth Deffeyes says that peak production will occur in 2005. We're there. Others, like Colin Campbell, former chief geologist for Shell Oil, put it more conservatively as between now and 2007. But by any measure of rational planning or policy-making, these differences are insignificant.

The meaning of the oil peak and its enormous implications are generally misunderstood even by those who have heard about it - and this includes the mainstream corporate media and the Americans who make plans or policy.

The world does not have to run out of oil or natural gas for severe instabilities, network breakdowns, and systems failures to occur. All that is necessary is for world production capacity to reach its absolute limit - a point at which no increased production is possible and the long arc of depletion commences, with oil production then falling by a few percentages steadily every year thereafter. That's the global oil peak: the end of absolute increased production and beginning of absolute declining production.

And, of course, as global oil production begins to steadily decline, year after year, the world population is only going to keep growing - at least for a while - and demand for oil will remain very robust. The demand line of the graph will pass the production line, and in doing so will set in motion all kinds of problems in the systems we rely on for daily life.

One huge implication of the oil peak is that industrial societies will never again enjoy the 2 to 7 percent annual economic growth that has been considered healthy for over 100 years. This amounts to the industrialized nations of the world finding themselves in a permanent depression.

Long before the oil actually depletes we will endure world-shaking political disturbances and economic disruptions. We will see globalism-in-reverse. Globalism was never an 'ism,' by the way. It was not a belief system. It was a manifestation of the 20-year-final-blowout of cheap oil. Like all economic distortions, it produced economic perversions. It allowed gigantic, predatory organisms like WalMart to spawn and reproduce at the expense of more cellular fine-grained economic communities.

The end of globalism will be hastened by international competition over the world's richest oil-producing regions.

We are already seeing the first military adventures over oil as the US attempts to pacify the Middle East in order to assure future supplies. This is by no means a project we can feel confident about. The Iraq war has only been the overture to more desperate contests ahead. Bear in mind that the most rapidly industrializing nation in the world, China, is geographically closer to Caspian Region and the Middle East than we are. The Chinese can walk into these regions, and someday they just might.

In any case, and apart from the likelihood of military mischief, as the world passes the petroleum peak the global oil markets will destabilize and the industrial nations will have enormous problems with both price and supply. The effect on currencies and international finance will, of course, be equally severe.

Some of you may be aware that the US faces an imminent crisis with natural gas, at least as threatening as the problems we face over oil. By natural gas I mean methane, the stuff we run our furnaces and kitchen stoves on.
Over the past two decades - in response to the OPEC embargoes of the 70s and the Chernobyl and Three Mile Island emergencies of the 80s -- we have so excessively shifted our electric power generation to dependence on natural gas that no amount of drilling can keep up with current demand. The situation is very ominous now.
The United States, indeed North America, including Canada and Mexico, is technically way past peak production in natural gas and there is a special problem with gas that you don't have with oil: you tend to get your gas from the continent you are on. It comes out of the ground and is distributed around the continent in a pipeline network.
If you have to get your natural gas from another continent, it has to be compressed at low temperature, transported in special ships with pressurized tanks, and delivered to special terminals where it is re-gasified. All this is tremendously more expensive than what we do now. Moreover, there are very few natural gas port terminals in the US and nobody wants them built anywhere near them because they are dangerous. They can blow up.
We have been making up for our shortfall in gas in recent years by buying a lot of gas from Canada. The NAFTA treaty compels them to sell us their gas, and they are technically in depletion too. They're not happy about this.
About half the houses in America are heated with natural gas. Nobody know what we are going to do when the depletion arc gets steeper.
Oh, another problem with gas. The wells run dry just like this (snap!). Unlike oil wells, which go from gusher to steady stream to declining stream, gas wells either put out gas or they stop. And there's no warning when they are close to running out. Because, the gas is coming out of the ground under its own pressure. As the gas wells of North America continue to deplete, we will have little warning

Right here I am compelled to inform you that the prospects for alternative fuels are poor. We suffer from a kind of Jiminy Cricket syndrome in this country. We believe that if you wish for something, it will come true. Right now a lot of people - including people who ought to know better - are wishing for some miracle technology to save our collective ass.

There is not going to be a hydrogen economy. The hydrogen economy is a fantasy. It is not going to happen. We may be able to run a very few things on hydrogen - but we are not going to replace the entire US automobile fleet with hydrogen fuel cell cars.

" Getting hydrogen
" Transport

Nor will we replace the current car fleet with electric cars or natural gas cars. We're just going to use cars a lot less. Fewer trips. Cars will be a diminished presence in our lives.
Not to mention the political problem that kicks in when car ownership and driving becomes incrementally a more elite activity. The mass motoring society worked because it was so profoundly democratic. Practically anybody in America could participate, from the lowliest shlub mopping the floor at Pizza Hut to Bill Gates. What happens when it is no longer so democratic? And what is the tipping point at which it becomes a matter of political resentment: 12 percent? 23 percent? 38 percent?

Wind power and solar electric will not produce significant amounts of power within the context of the way we live now.

Ethanol and bio-deisel are a joke. They require more energy to produce than they give back. You know how you get ethanol: you produce massive amounts of corn using huge oil and gas 'inputs' of fertilizer and pesticide and then you use a lot more energy to turn the corn into ethanol. It's a joke.

No combination of alternative fuel systems currently known will allow us to run what we are running, the way we're running it, or even a substantial fraction of it.

The future is therefore telling us very loudly that we will have to change the way we live in this country. The implications are clear: we will have to downscale and re-scale virtually everything we do.

The downscaling of America is a tremendous and inescapable project. It is the master ecological project of our time. We will have to do it whether we like it or not. We are not prepared.

Downscaling America doesn't mean we become a lesser people. It means that the scale at which we conduct the work of American daily life will have to be adjusted to fit the requirements of a post-globalist, post-cheap-oil age.

We are going to have to live a lot more locally and a lot more intensively on that local level. Industrial agriculture, as represented by the Archer Daniels Midland / soda pop and cheez doodle model of doing things, will not survive the end of the cheap oil economy.
The implication of this is enormous. Successful human ecologies in the near future will have to be supported by intensively farmed agricultural hinterlands. Places that can't do this will fail. Say goodbye to Phoenix and Las Vegas.

I'm not optimistic about most of our big cities. They are going to have to contract severely. They achieved their current scale during the most exuberant years of the cheap oil fiesta, and they will have enormous problems remaining viable afterward.
Any mega-structure, whether it is a skyscraper or a landscraper - buildings that depend on huge amounts of natural gas and electricity - may not be usable a decade or two in the future.

What goes for the scale of places will be equally true for the scale of social organization. All large-scale enterprises, including many types of corporations and governments will function very poorly in the post-cheap oil world. Do not make assumptions based on things like national chain retail continuing to exist as it has.

Wal Mart is finished. [More below]

Many of my friends and colleagues live in fear of the federal government turning into Big Brother tyranny. I'm skeptical Once the permanent global energy crisis really gets underway, the federal government will be lucky if it can answer the phones. Same thing for Microsoft or even the Hannaford supermarket chain.

All indications are that American life will have to be reconstituted along the lines of traditional towns, villages, and cities much reduced in their current scale. These will be the most successful places once we are gripped by the profound challenge of a permanent reduced energy supply.

The land development industry as we have known it is going to vanish in the years ahead. The production home-builders, as they like to call themselves. The strip mall developers. The fried food shack developers. Say goodbye to all that.

We are entering a period of economic hardship and declining incomes. The increment of new development will be very small, probably the individual building lot.
The suburbs as are going to tank spectacularly. We are going to see an unprecedented loss of equity value and, of course, basic usefulness. We are going to see an amazing distress sale of properties, with few buyers. We're going to see a fight over the table scraps of the 20th century. We'll be lucky if the immense failure of suburbia doesn't result in an extreme political orgy of grievance and scapegoating.

The action in the years ahead will be in renovating existing towns and villages, and connecting them with regions of productive agriculture. Where the big cities are concerned, there is simply no historical precedent for the downscaling they will require. The possibilities for social and political distress ought to be obvious, though. The process is liable to be painful and disorderly.

The post cheap oil future will be much more about staying where you are than about being mobile. And, unless we rebuild a US passenger railroad network,a lot of people will not be going anywhere. Today, we have a passenger railroad system that the Bulgarians would be ashamed of.

Don't make too many plans to design parking structures. The post cheap oil world is not going to be about parking, either.

But it will be about the design and assembly and reconstituting of places that are worth caring about and worth being in. When you have to stay where you are and live locally, you will pay a lot more attention to the quality of your surroundings, especially if you are not moving through the landscape at 50 miles-per-hour.

Some regions of the country will do better than others. The sunbelt will suffer in exact proportion to the degree that it prospered artificially during the cheap oil blowout of the late 20th century. I predict that the Southwest will become substantially depopulated, since they will be short of water as well as gasoline and natural gas. I'm not optimistic about the Southeast either, for different reasons. I think it will be subject to substantial levels of violence as the grievances of the formerly middle class boil over and combine with the delusions of Pentecostal Christian extremism.

All regions of the nation will be affected by the vicissitudes of this Long Emergency, but I think New England and the Upper Midwest have somewhat better prospects. I regard them as less likely to fall into lawlessness, anarchy, or despotism, and more likely to salvage the bits and pieces of our best social traditions and keep them in operation at some level.

There is a fair chance that the nation will disaggregate into autonomous regions before the 21st century is over, as a practical matter if not officially. Life will be very local.

These challenges are immense. We will have to rebuild local networks of economic and social relations that we allowed to be systematically dismantled over the past fifty years. In the process, our communities may be able to reconstitute themselves.

The economy of the mid 21st century may center on agriculture. Not information. Not the digital manipulation of pictures, not services like selling cheeseburgers and entertaining tourists. Farming. Food production. The transition to this will be traumatic, given the destructive land-use practices of our time, and the staggering loss of knowledge. We will be lucky if we can feed ourselves.

The age of the 3000-mile-caesar salad will soon be over. Food production based on massive petroleum inputs, on intensive irrigation, on gigantic factory farms in just a few parts of the nation, and dependent on cheap trucking will not continue. We will have to produce at least some of our food closer to home. We will have to do it with fewer fossil-fuel-based fertilizers and pesticides on smaller-scaled farms. Farming will have to be much more labor-intensive than it is now. We will see the return of an entire vanished social class - the homegrown American farm laboring class.

N

We are going to have to reorganize everyday commerce in this nation from the ground up. The whole system of continental-scale big box discount and chain store shopping is headed for extinction, and sooner than you might think. It will go down fast and hard. Americans will be astonished when it happens.

Operations like WalMart have enjoyed economies of scale that were attained because of very special and anomalous historical circumstances: a half century of relative peace between great powers. And cheap oil - absolutely reliable supplies of it, since the OPEC disruptions of the 1970s.

WalMart and its imitators will not survive the oil market disruptions to come. Not even for a little while. WalMart will not survive when its merchandise supply chains to Asia are interrupted by military contests over oil or internal conflict in the nations that have been supplying us with ultra-cheap manufactured goods. WalMart's "warehouse on wheels" will not be able to operate in a non-cheap oil economy

It will only take mild-to-moderate disruptions in the supply and price of gas to put WalMart and all operations like it out of business. And it will happen. As that occurs, America will have to make other arrangements for the distribution and sale of ordinary products.

It will have to be reorganized at the regional and the local scale. It will have to be based on moving merchandise shorter distances at multiple increments and probably by multiple modes of transport. It is almost certain to result in higher costs for the things we buy, and fewer choices of things. We are not going to rebuild the cheap oil manufacturing facilities of the 20th century.

We will have to recreate the lost infrastructures of local and regional commerce, and it will have to be multi-layered. These were the people that WalMart systematically put out of business over the last thirty years. The wholesalers, the jobbers, the small-retailers. They were economic participants in their communities; they made decisions that had to take the needs of their communities into account. they were employers who employed their neighbors. They were a substantial part of the middle-class of every community in America and all of them together played civic roles in our communities as the caretakers of institutions - the people who sat on the library boards, and the hospital boards, and bought the balls and bats and uniforms for the little league teams.
We got rid of them in order to save nine bucks on a hair dryer. We threw away uncountable millions of dollars worth of civic amenity in order to shop at the Big Box discount stores. That was some bargain.
This will all change. The future is telling us to prepare to do business locally again. It will not be a hyper-turbo-consumer economy. That will be over with. But we will still make things, and buy and sell things.

A lot of the knowledge needed to do local retail has been lost, because in the past the ownership of local retail businesses was often done by families. The knowledge and skills for doing it was transmitted from one generation to the next. It will not be so easy to get that back. But we have to do it.

Education is another system that will probably have to change. Our centralized schools are too big and too dependent on fleets of buses. Children will have to live closer to the schools they attend. School will have to be reorganized on a neighborhood basis, at a much smaller scale, in smaller buildings -- and they will not look like medium security prisons.

The psychology of previous investment is a huge obstacle to the reform of education. We poured fifty years of our national wealth into gigantic sprawling centralized schools - but that investment itself does not guarantee that these schools will be able to function in a future that works very differently.
In the years ahead college will no longer be just another "consumer product." Fewer people will go to them. They will probably revert to their former status as elite institutions, whether we like it or not. Many of them will close altogether.

Change is coming whether we like it or not; whether we are prepared for it or not. If we don't begin right away to make better choices then we will face political, social, and economic disorders that will shake this nation to its foundation.

I hope you will go back to your offices and classrooms and workplaces with these ideas in mind and think about what your roles will be in this challenging future. Good luck. Prepare for a different America, perhaps a better America. And prepare to be good neighbors.

End

Entry link: Remarks in Hudson

PetroCollapse

(Last edited: sábado, 15 abril 2006, 1:46 )

Home

PetroCollapse New York Conference
October 5, 2005

Remarks by James Howard Kunstler
Author of The Long Emergency

In the waning months of 2005, our failure to face the problems before us as a society is a wondrous thing to behold. Never before in American history have the public and its leaders shown such a lack of resolve, or even interest, in circumstances that will change forever how we live.

Even the greatest convulsion in our national experience, the Civil War, was preceded by years of talk, if not action. But in 2005 we barely have enough talk about what is happening to add up to a public conversation. We're too busy following Paris Hilton and Michael Jackson, or the NASCAR rankings, or the exploits of Donald Trump. We're immersed in a national personality freak show soap opera, with a side order of sports 24-7.

Our failure to pay attention to what is important is unprecedented, even supernatural.

This is true even at the supposedly highest level. The news section of last Sunday's New York Times did not contain one story about oil or gas - a week after Hurricane Rita destroyed or damaged hundreds of drilling rigs and production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico - which any thought person can see leading directly to a winter of hardship for many Americans who can barely afford to heat their homes - and the information about the damage around the Gulf was still just then coming in.

What is important?

We've entered a permanent world-wide energy crisis. The implications are enormous. It could put us out-of-business as a cohesive society.

We face a crisis in finance, which will be a consequence of the energy predicament as well as a broad and deep lapse in our standards, values, and behavior in financial affairs.

We face a crisis in practical living arrangements as the infrastructure of suburbia becomes hopelessly unaffordable to run. How will fill our gas tanks to make those long commutes? How will we heat the 3500 square foot homes that people are already in? How will we run the yellow school bus fleets? How will we heat the schools?

What will happen to the economy connected with the easy motoring utopia - the building of ever more McHouses, WalMarts, office parks, and Pizza Huts? Over the past thirty days, with gasoline prices ratcheting above $3 a gallon, individuals all over America are deciding not to buy that new house in Partridge Acres, 34 miles from Dallas (or Minneapolis, or Denver, or Boston). Those individual choices will soon add up, and an economy addicted to that activity will be in trouble.

The housing bubble has virtually become our economy. Subtract it from everything else and there's not much left besides haircutting, fried chicken, and open heart surgery.

And, of course, as the housing bubble deflates, the magical mortgage machinery spinning off a fabulous stream of hallucinated credit, to be re-packaged as tradable debt, will also stop flowing into the finance sector.

We face a series of ramifying, self-reinforcing, terrifying breaks from business-as-usual, and we are not prepared. We are not talking about it in the traditional forums - only in the wilderness of the internet.

Mostly we face a crisis of clear thinking which will lead to further crises of authority and legitimacy - of who can be trusted to hold this project of civilization together.

Americans were once a brave and forward-looking people, willing to face the facts, willing to work hard, to acknowledge the common good and contribute to it, willing to make difficult choices. We've become a nation of overfed clowns and crybabies, afraid of the truth, indifferent to the common good, hardly even a common culture, selfish, belligerent, narcissistic whiners seeking every means possible to live outside a reality-based community.

These are the consequences of a value system that puts comfort, convenience, and leisure above all other considerations. These are not enough to hold a civilization together. We've signed off on all other values since the end of World War Two. Our great victory over manifest evil half a century ago was such a triumph that we have effectively - and incrementally - excused ourselves from all other duties, obligations and responsibilities.

Which is exactly why we have come to refer to ourselves as consumers. That's what we call ourselves on TV, in the newspapers, in the legislatures. Consumers. What a degrading label for people who used to be citizens.

Consumers have no duties, obligations, or responsibilities to anything besides their own desire to eat more Cheez Doodles and drink more beer. Think about yourself that way for twenty or thirty years and it will affect the collective spirit very negatively. And our behavior. The biggest losers, of course, end up being the generations of human beings who will follow us, because in the course of mutating into consumers, preoccupied with our Cheez Doodle consumption, we gave up on the common good, which means that we gave up on the future, and the people who will dwell in it.

There are a few other impediments to our collective thinking which obstruct a coherent public discussion of the events facing us which I call the Long Emergency. They can be described with precision.

Because the creation of suburbia was the greatest misallocation of resources in the history of the world, it has entailed a powerful psychology of previous investment - meaning, that we have put so much of our collective wealth into a particular infrastructure for daily life, that we can't imagine changing it, or reforming it, or letting go of it. The psychology of previous investment is exactly what makes this way of life non-negotiable.

Another obstacle to clear thinking I refer to as the Las Vegas-i-zation of the American mind. The ethos of gambling is based on a particular idea: the belief that it is possible to get something for nothing. The psychology of unearned riches. This idea has now insidiously crept out of the casinos and spread far-and-wide and lodged itself in every corner of our lives. It's there in the interest-only, no down payment, quarter million-dollar mortgages given to people with no record of ever paying back a loan. It's there in the grade inflation of the ivy league colleges where everybody gets As and Bs regardless of performance. It's in the rap videos of young men flashing 10,000-dollar watches acquired by making up nursery rhymes about gangster life - and in the taboos that prevent us from even talking about that. It's in the suburbanite's sense of entitlement to a supposedly non-negotiable easy motoring existence.

The idea that it's possible to get something for nothing is alive and rampant among those who think we can run the interstate highway system and Walt Disney World on bio-diesel or solar power.

People who believe that it is possible to get something for nothing have trouble living in a reality-based community.

This is even true of the well-intentioned lady in my neighborhood who drives a Ford Expedition with the War Is Not the Answer bumper sticker on it. The truth, for her, is that War IS the Answer. She needs to get down with that. She needs to prepare to send her children to be blown up in Asia.

The Las Vegas-i-zation of the American mind is a pernicious idea in itself, but it is compounded by another mental problem, which I call the Jiminy Cricket syndrome. Jiminy Cricket was Pinocchio's little sidekick in the Walt Disney Cartoon feature. The idea is that when you wish upon a star, your dreams come true. It's a nice sentiment for children, perhaps, but not really suited to adults who have to live in a reality-based community, especially in difficult times.

The idea - that when you wish upon a star, your dreams come true - obviously comes from the immersive environment of advertising and the movies, which is to say, an immersive environment of make-believe, of pretend. Trouble is, the world-wide energy crisis is not make-believe, and we can't pretend our way through it, and those of us who are adults cannot afford to think like children, no matter how comforting it is.

Combine when you wish upon a star, your dreams come true with the belief that it is possible to get something for nothing, and the psychology of previous investment and you get a powerful recipe for mass delusional thinking.
As our society comes under increasing stress, we're liable to see increased delusional thinking, as worried people retreat further into make-believe and pretend.

The desperate defense of our supposedly non-negotiable way of life may lead to delusional politics that we have never seen before in this land. An angry and grievance-filled public may turn to political maniacs to preserve their entitlements to the easy motoring utopia - even while reality negotiates things for us.

I maintain that we may see leaders far more dangerous in our future than George W. Bush.

The last thing that this group needs is to get sidetracked in paranoid conspiracy politics, such as the idea that Dick Cheney orchestrated the World Trade Center attacks, which I regard as just another form of make-believe.

This is what we have to overcome to face the reality-based challenges of our time.

At the bottom of the Peak Oil issue is the fear that we're not going to make it.

The Long Emergency looming before us is going to produce a lot of losers. Economic losers. People who will lose jobs, vocations, incomes, possessions, assets - and never get them back. Social losers. People who will lose position, power, advantage. And just plain losers, people who will lose their health and their lives.

There are no magic remedies for what we face, but there are intelligent responses that we can marshal individually and collectively. We will have to do what circumstances require of us.

We are faced with the necessity to downscale, re-scale, right-size, and reorganize all the fundamental activities of daily life: the way we grow food; the way we conduct everyday commerce and the manufacture of things that we need; the way we school our children; the size, shape, and scale of our towns and cities.

These are huge tasks. How can we bring a reality-based spirit to them?

I have a suggestion. Let's start with one down-to-earth project that we can take on with confidence, something we have a reasonable shot at accomplishing, and fairly quickly, something that will address our energy problems directly and will make a difference for the better. Let's get started rebuilding the passenger railroad system in our country.
Nothing else we might do would make such a substantial impact on our outlandish oil consumption.

We have a railroad system that the Bulgarians would be ashamed of.

The fact that we are not talking about this shows how deeply unserious we are - especially the Democratic party. I am a registered Democrat. Where is my party on this issue? Where was John Kerry? Where are Senators Hillary Clinton and Charles Schumer? We should demand that they get serious about rebuilding the public transit of America - not next month or next year but tomorrow, starting at the crack of dawn.

Any person or any group who finds themselves in trouble has to begin somewhere. They have to take a step that will prove to themselves that they are not helpless, that they are capable of accomplishing something, and accomplishing that first thing will build the confidence to move on to the next step.

That's how people save themselves, how they reconnect with reality-based virtue.

We were once such a people. We were brave, resourceful, generous, and earnest. The last thing we believed was the idea that it was possible to get something for nothing. That we were entitled to a particular outcome in life, apart from the choices we made and how we acted. We can recover those forsaken elements of our collective character. We can be guided, as Abraham Lincoln said, by the better angels of our nature.

We lived in a beautiful country with vibrant towns and cities, and a gorgeous, productive rural landscape, and we were sufficiently rewarded by them so we did feel driven to seek refuge in make-believe all the livelong day. When we wanted to accomplish something we set out to do it, to make it happen, not merely to wish for it. We knew the difference between wishing and doing - which is probably the most important thing that adult human beings can know.

I hope we can get back to being that kind of people. This effort here today is a good start.

Entry link: PetroCollapse

Law professor bans laptops in class, over student protest

(Last edited: segunda, 3 abril 2006, 12:03 )

Law professor bans laptops in class, over student protest

 http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2006-03-21-professor-laptop-ban_x.htm

Posted 3/21/2006 7:44 PM

 

MEMPHIS (AP) A group of University of Memphis law students are passing a petition against a professor who banned laptop computers from her classroom because she considers them a distraction in lectures.

On March 6, Professor June Entman warned her first-year law students by e-mail to bring pens and paper to take notes in class.

"My main concern was they were focusing on trying to transcribe every word that was I saying, rather than thinking and analyzing," Entman said Monday. "The computers interfere with making eye contact. You've got this picket fence between you and the students."

The move didn't sit well with the students, who have begun collecting signatures against the move and tried to file a complaint with the American Bar Association. The complaint, based on an ABA rule for technology at law schools, was dismissed.

"Our major concern is the snowball effect," said law school student Jennifer Bellott. "If you open the door for one professor, you open the door for every other professor to do the same thing."

"If we continue without laptops, I'm out of here. I'm gone; I won't be able to keep up," said student Cory Winsett, who said his hand-written notes are incomplete and less organized.

Law School Dean James Smoot said the decision was up to the professor, but the conflict has caused faculty to consider technology issues as the school prepares to move to a more advanced downtown facility in coming years.

Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
Entry link: Law professor bans laptops in class, over student protest

Windows Is So Slow, but Why?

(Last edited: segunda, 27 março 2006, 5:35 )
The New York Times
spacer.gifPrinter Friendly Format Sponsored Bytyfs_nytimes_logo_88x31.jpg
01

March 27, 2006

Windows Is So Slow, but Why? />

/>

Back in 1998, the federal government declared that its landmark antitrust suit against the Microsoft Corporation was not merely a matter of law enforcement, but a defense of innovation. The concern was that the company was wielding its market power and its strategy of bundling more and more features into its dominant Windows desktop operating system to thwart competition and stifle innovation.

Eight years later, long after Microsoft lost and then settled the antitrust case, it turns out that Windows is indeed stifling innovation at Microsoft.

The company's marathon effort to come up with the a new version of its desktop operating system, called Windows Vista, has repeatedly stalled. Last week, in the latest setback, Microsoft conceded that Vista would not be ready for consumers until January, missing the holiday sales season, to the chagrin of personal computer makers and electronics retailers and those computer users eager to move up from Windows XP, a five-year-old product.

In those five years, Apple Computer has turned out four new versions of its Macintosh operating system, beating Microsoft to market with features that will be in Vista, like desktop search, advanced 3-D graphics and "widgets," an array of small, single-purpose programs like news tickers, traffic reports and weather maps.

So what's wrong with Microsoft? There is, after all, no shortage of smart software engineers working at the corporate campus in Redmond, Wash. The problem, it seems, is largely that Microsoft's past success and its bundling strategy have become a weakness.

Windows runs on 330 million personal computers worldwide. Three hundred PC manufacturers around the world install Windows on their machines; thousands of devices like printers, scanners and music players plug into Windows computers; and tens of thousands of third-party software applications run on Windows. And a crucial reason Microsoft holds more than 90 percent of the PC operating system market is that the company strains to make sure software and hardware that ran on previous versions of Windows will also work on the new one compatibility, in computing terms.

As a result, each new version of Windows carries the baggage of its past. As Windows has grown, the technical challenge has become increasingly daunting. Several thousand engineers have labored to build and test Windows Vista, a sprawling, complex software construction project with 50 million lines of code, or more than 40 percent larger than Windows XP.

"Windows is now so big and onerous because of the size of its code base, the size of its ecosystem and its insistence on compatibility with the legacy hardware and software, that it just slows everything down," observed David B. Yoffie, a professor at the Harvard Business School. "That's why a company like Apple has such an easier time of innovation."

Microsoft certainly understands the problem, the need to change and the potential long-term threat to its business from rivals like Apple, the free Linux operating system, and from companies like Google that distribute software as a service over the Internet.

In an internal memo last October, Ray Ozzie, chief technical officer, who joined Microsoft last year, wrote, "Complexity kills. It sucks the life out of developers, it makes products difficult to plan, build and test, it introduces security challenges and it causes end-user and administrator frustration."

Last Monday afternoon, James Allchin, the longtime engineering executive who leads the Vista team, held a meeting with 75 Windows managers and senior engineers to discuss the status of Vista. On Tuesday morning, Mr. Allchin met with a handful of his lieutenants and told them of the decision to push back the consumer introduction, a move that was announced publicly later that day, after the close of the stock market.

Brad Goldberg, a general manager of Windows program management, who attended the Tuesday morning meeting, said he was not surprised, because he had been involved in the decision. "But it's a different place than Microsoft a few years ago would have wound up," he said.

Like other Microsoft executives, Mr. Goldberg bristles at the notion that little innovative work has come out of the Windows group since XP. In the last five years, he said, Microsoft has released two versions of the Windows Tablet PC software intended for pen-based notebook computers, and four versions of Windows Media Center. To combat viruses plaguing Windows, much of the engineering team focused for 18 months on fixing security flaws for a downloadable "service pack" in 2004.

"The perception that nothing new has come out of the Windows group since XP is just so far from the truth," Mr. Goldberg said.

But last Thursday, Microsoft reorganized the management of its Windows division. Steven Sinofsky, 40, a senior vice president, was placed in charge of product planning and engineering for Windows and Windows Live, a new Web service that lets consumers manage their e-mail accounts, instant messaging, blogs, photos and podcasts in one site.

Mr. Sinofsky, a former technical assistant to Bill Gates, the Microsoft chairman, was one of the early people in the company to recognize the importance of the Internet in the 1990's. He comes to the Windows job from heading Microsoft's big Office division, where he was known for bringing out new versions of the Office suite Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and other offerings on schedule every two or three years.

The move is seen as an effort to bring greater discipline to the Windows group. "But this doesn't seem to do anything to address the core Windows problem; Windows is too big and too complex," said Michael A. Cusumano, a professor at the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The Vista delay, Microsoft executives said, was only a matter of a few more weeks to improve quality further, not attributable to any single flaw and done to make sure all its industry partners were ready when the product was introduced. Vista will be ready for large corporate customers in November, while the consumer rollout is being pushed back to January 2007.

Mr. Allchin conceded in an interview that the decision was "a bit painful," but he insisted it was the "right thing." Mr. Allchin, 54, will continue to work on Vista until it ships and then retire, as he said he would last year.

Microsoft will not say so, but antitrust considerations may have played a role in the decision that Mr. Allchin called the right thing to do. As part of its antitrust settlement, Microsoft vowed to treat PC makers even-handedly, after evidence in the trial that Microsoft had rewarded some PC makers with better pricing or more marketing help in exchange for giving Microsoft products an edge over competing software.

In the last few weeks, Microsoft met with major PC makers and retailers to discuss Vista. Hewlett-Packard, the second-largest PC maker after Dell, is a leader in the consumer market. Yet unlike Dell, Hewlett-Packard sells extensively through retailers, whose orders must be taken and shelves stocked. That takes time.

Hewlett-Packard, according to a person close to the company who asked not to be identified because he was told the information confidentially, informed Microsoft that unless Vista was locked down and ready by August, Hewlett-Packard would be at a disadvantage in the year-end sales season.

Vista was also held up because the project was restarted in the summer of 2004. By then, it became clear to Mr. Allchin and others inside Microsoft that the way they were trying to build the new version of Windows, then called Longhorn, would not work. Two years' worth of work was scrapped, and some planned features were dropped, like an intelligent data storage system called WinFS.

The new work, Microsoft decided, would take a new approach. Vista was built more in small modules that then fit together like Lego blocks, making development and testing easier to manage.

"They did the right thing in deciding that the Longhorn code was a tangled, hopeless mess, and starting over," said Mr. Cusumano of M.I.T. "But Vista is still an enormous, complex structure."

Skeptics like Mr. Cusumano say that fixing the Windows problem will take a more radical approach, a willingness to walk away from its legacy. One instructive example, they say, is what happened at Apple.

Remember that Steven P. Jobs came back to Apple because the company's effort to develop an ambitious new operating system, codenamed Copland, had failed. Mr. Jobs convinced Apple to buy his company Next Inc. for $400 million in December 1996 for its operating system.

It took Mr. Jobs and his team years to retool and tailor the Next operating system into what became Macintosh OS X. When it arrived in 2001, the new system essentially walked away from Apple's previous operating system, OS 9. Software applications written for OS 9 would run on an OS X machine, but only by firing up the old operating system separately.

The approach was somewhat ungainly, but it allowed Apple to move to a new technology, a more stable, elegantly designed operating system. The one sacrifice was that OS X would not be compatible with old Macintosh programs, a step Microsoft has always refused to take with Windows.

"Microsoft feels it can't get away with breaking compatibility," said Mendel Rosenblum, a Stanford University computer scientist. "All of their applications must continue to run, and from an architectural point of view that's a very painful thing."

It is also costly in terms of time, money and manpower. Where Microsoft has thousands of engineers on its Windows team, Apple has a lean development group of roughly 350 programmers and fewer than 100 software testers, according to two Apple employees who spoke on the condition that they not be identified.

And Apple had the advantage of building on software from university laboratories, an experimental version of the Unix operating system developed at Carnegie Mellon University and a free variant of Unix from the University of California, Berkeley. That helps explain why a small team at Apple has been able to build an operating system rich in features with nearly as many lines of code as Microsoft's Windows.

And Apple, which makes operating systems that run only on its own computers, does not have to work with the massive business ecosystem of Microsoft, with its hundreds of PC makers and thousands of third-party software companies.

That ballast is also Microsoft's great strength, and a reason industry partners and computer users stick with Windows, even if its size and strategy slow innovation. Unless Microsoft can pick up the pace, "consumers may simply end up with a more and more inferior operating system over time, which is sad," said Mr. Yoffie of the Harvard Business School.

/>
Entry link: Windows Is So Slow, but Why?

"É muito mais fácil ensinar matemática e ciência do que artes"

(Last edited: quinta, 16 março 2006, 4:27 )

PÚBLICO - EDIÇÃO IMPRESSA - SOCIEDADE

Director: José Manuel Fernandes

Directores-adjuntos: Nuno Pacheco e Manuel Carvalho POL nº 5823 | Terça, 7 de Março de 2006

"É muito mais fácil ensinar matemática e ciência do que artes"

Conferência da UNESCO reúne centenas de cientistas, professores e artistas. Separação dos processos cognitivo e emocional é "completamente injustificada"

Nas últimas décadas o ensino tem privilegiado o desenvolvimento das áreas cognitivas, esquecendo que "um currículo escolar que integra as artes e as humanidades é imprescindível à formação de bons cidadãos", disse ontem o cientista português António Damásio, durante a Conferência Mundial de Educação Artística, que a UNESCO promove em Lisboa até quinta-feira.

Para este investigador na área das neurociências, que interveio na sessão de abertura depois do director-geral da UNESCO, Koichiro Matsuura, e do Presidente da República, Jorge Sampaio, é necessário que a educação evolua de acordo com o princípio de que separar o processo cognitivo do emocional é "um erro".

"A divisão é completamente injustificada", defende Damásio. "A ciência e a matemática são muito importantes, mas a arte e as humanidades são imprescindíveis à imaginação e ao pensamento intuitivo que estão por trás do que é novo. As capacidades cognitivas não bastam."

Para o cientista, que diz compreender que os governos invistam na matemática e nas ciências por considerarem que isso os torna competitivos, "não devemos abdicar da educação artística só porque o tempo e os recursos são limitados".

Educar, acrescenta, envolve a mente e o cérebro.

Conceitos que estão habitualmente associados às artes - estética, belo, prazer - são na realidade "transversais". Não é por acaso, garante Damásio, que Einstein falava na beleza de uma demonstração matemática ou no facto de as equações serem "feias".

Apesar de serem muito diferentes um do outro - "o nosso processo emocional não se desenvolve com a mesma rapidez do cognitivo" -, são ambos fundamentais. "As emoções qualificam as ideias e as acções, sem elas não reflectiríamos", explica, acrescentando que a investigação actual defende que o desenvolvimento moral e ético se baseia em emoções. A poesia, a dança, o teatro ou as artes visuais podem ser usados para formar e treinar o espírito reflexivo, "o único que vale a pena ter".

A importância da imaginação

António Damásio não tem dúvidas em afirmar que "é muito mais fácil ensinar matemática e ciência do que artes", posição com que Ken Robinson, especialista britânico em educação artística e criatividade, concorda. "As artes exigem tempo e um tipo de empenho diferente", diz. "Muitas vezes os professores não estão lá para ensinar os alunos, mas para ensinar matérias. A preparação para as artes não é tão boa como a retórica sobre as artes." Robinson, que hoje vive nos Estados Unidos e é consultor do J. Paul Getty Center de Los Angeles, defendeu em Lisboa que a imaginação é tão importante para os alunos do século XXI como os números e as letras, apesar de as artes estarem quase sempre no fim da lista de prioridades do ensino escolar público.

"Temos tendência a separar as artes da ciência, quando na realidade são complementares. Os grandes cientistas são incrivelmente criativos e intuitivos. O processo científico valida, demonstra. É a imaginação que cria." Para Robinson, as artes devem ser vistas como motor de transformação do sistema de ensino: "Gastamos muito tempo e energia a tentar fazer com que o actual sistema de ensino assimile as artes, quando devíamos era pensar em formas de criar, através delas, um sistema novo." Lucinda Canelas

http://jornal.publico.clix.pt/noticias.asp?a=2006&m=03&d=07&uid=&id=67080&sid=7377
Entry link: "É muito mais fácil ensinar matemática e ciência do que artes"

Ensino artístico é fundamental, António Damásio

(Last edited: quarta, 15 março 2006, 5:06 )

Ensino artístico é fundamental

2006/03/06 | 13:04

E não deve ser secundarizado face à Matemática e outras ciências, diz António Damásio

O neurocientista António Damásio considerou hoje que o ensino artístico é fundamental para o desenvolvimento de bons cidadãos e que o seu papel não deve ser secundarizado nas escolas face à Matemática e outras ciências exactas, noticia a agência Lusa.

O investigador radicado nos Estados Unidos, falava na Conferência Mundial de Educação Artística, que hoje se iniciou no Centro Cultural de Belém, em Lisboa, onde durante quatro dias cerca de 700 participantes de 150 países vão estar reunidos para debater a educação artística a convite da UNESCO.

«O teatro, a literatura, a poesia e outras artes criam emoções inesquecíveis e a sua aprendizagem é muito importante na criatividade, no desenvolvimento de capacidades ligadas à inovação», argumentou o investigador durante a primeira conferência deste encontro.

Director do Instituto do Cérebro e da Criartividade da Universidade da Califórnia, António Damásio é professor de psicologia, neurociência e neurologia.

Na sua intervenção, intitulada «Cérebro, Arte e Educação», o cientista alertou que, no mundo actual da globalização e grande velocidade de informação, as aptidões cognitivas das novas gerações desenvolvem-se muito mais rapidamente do que as suas capacidades emocionais e estas últimas são essenciais para a formação de cidadãos.

«Sabemos hoje que as crianças afectadas nos seus sistemas emocionais não vão conseguir aprender as convenções sociais em adultos», disse, acrescentando que a sociedade não deve subalternizar o plano cognitivo ao plano emocional.

António Damásio considerou «preocupante» o desfasamento entre o desenvolvimento do lado cognitivo, normalmente mais valorizado porque é associado à razão, e o lado emocional entre as crianças e jovens nas sociedades actuais e as suas consequências futuras.

http://www.portugaldiario.iol.pt/noticia.php?id=654294&div_id=291
Entry link: Ensino artístico é fundamental, António Damásio

MAIS VALE VERDES DO QUE MORTOS

(Last edited: sábado, 11 fevereiro 2006, 7:16 )
16:00 (JPP)

MAIS VALE VERDES DO QUE MORTOS

Pacheco Pereira, Público, 8 Fev 2006

Eu pensei que as coisas estavam melhores do que o que estão, mas, mais uma vez, se percebe como há apenas uma fina película entre a civilização e a barbárie. Película que estamos a deixar romper com a maior das displicências. Devia desconfiar que é assim porque os sinais estão por todo o lado. Mas a gente acredita, quer acreditar, que algumas dezenas de anos de democracia consolidada (na maioria da Europa) e duas centenas de anos desde a revolução americana e francesa tinham consolidado a liberdade como princípio. Mas não é, não é suficiente, como se vê.

Estamos em guerra e estamos a perder. Estamos a perder, antes de tudo, porque ainda não percebemos que estamos em guerra. A retórica olimpiana, de um mundo "multicultural", de uma "comunidade internacional" eficaz, assente na lei e na Realpolitik moderada, ofusca-nos e impede-nos de ver o que está à nossa frente. Muitos sublimam as fraquezas, transformando-as num arremedo de "diplomacia" que não é senão contemporização e complacência, outros têm medo e estão dispostos à servidão, outros minimizam o que acontece para não quebrar o mundo ideal em que vivem.

Estamos a perder por dentro, o que é pior. A crise das caricaturas dinamarquesas é disso o melhor sinal. Mortos e feridos, atentados, violências, destruição de embaixadas, expulsão de estrangeiros, muitos deles os dadores de solidariedade, intolerância exaltada e absoluta, e nós, os visados, arrastamo-nos pela culpa. A UE gaguejou, no limite do pedido de desculpas, e Portugal, pela voz do ministro dos Negócios Estrangeiros, foi ainda mais longe do que o pedido de desculpas, condenou os caricaturistas e calou-se face à violência absurda e orquestrada que passa por ser "a rua árabe".

A comunicação social que costuma ser hiper-sensível à questão da liberdade de expressão, muitas vezes de forma puramente gratuita e corporativa, para encobrir os seus abusos, está numa de "respeito", de "contexto", de "bom senso", de "bom gosto". Encontram-se mil e um pretextos e mil e uma desculpas para se não ser claro: é o jornal dinamarquês que é dúplice e se recusou a caricaturar Cristo, é o jornal dinamarquês que é racista e antiárabe e encomendou as caricaturas de forma provocatória, é Sousa Lara, Abecasis, e as cenas à volta do filme sobre a Virgem Maria, é o abaixo-assinado contra a caricatura de António do Papa com o preservativo no nariz, é tudo e mais alguma coisa. Estamos a falar do mesmo? Quero lá saber se o jornal dinamarquês é respeitável, equilibrado, sensato, equidistante do islão e da cristandade, quero lá saber se o New York Times não passou as caricaturas, ou se a SIC e a RTP as mostraram veladas e à distância! O que eu quero saber é que se o valor da liberdade, e da sua forma especial, o da liberdade de expressão, não está em causa nestes eventos, então não sei o que é a liberdade.

Pergunta-se (sinistra pergunta nos dias de hoje, que mal se formula culpabiliza os dinamarqueses): é a liberdade de expressão absoluta? Não, não é. Tem limites na lei na democracia, tem regras mínimas, para proteger outras liberdades e outros direitos. Regras mínimas, aliás habitualmente violadas sem consequência, para proteger a dignidade dos indivíduos, a sua intimidade, a sua personalidade, o seu direito de não ser caluniado. Mas são regras para os indivíduos, não são nem para religiões, nem comunidades, nem crenças, nem para a "blasfémia". Mesmo assim, o abuso destes limites é comum, justificado pelo "interesse público", e é raríssimo ver a comunicação social a discutir tão voluntariamente os seus limites no "bom senso" e no "bom gosto", quanto mais no "respeito" e muito menos no "contexto". Ainda bem, vivemos com esta realidade, não é perfeita, mas é melhor do que o seu contrário. Por isso repito a mesma pergunta: é a liberdade de expressão absoluta neste caso? É. Ou é absoluta ou não é.

De novo, insisto, não quero saber se houve intenção de ofender (e depois?), de fazer propaganda anti-islão (e depois?), de ser simplista na representação do "martírio" (e depois?), de rebaixar Maomé (e depois?) de associar o islão ao terrorismo (e depois? É proibido?). É acaso proibido representar Deus-pai como um velho lúbrico como faz Vilhena e Crumb, e Cristo como um alegre imbecil como fizeram os Monty Python? É que se não é para defender este direito de se exprimir no limite das nossas crenças, a liberdade não serve para nada. É que também convém não esquecer que a nossa liberdade foi conquistada exactamente aqui, contra a intolerância religiosa. A essência da liberdade, tal como a entendemos, é a liberdade do outro, de escrever, desenhar, pintar, representar, filmar aquilo com que não concordamos, aquilo que consideramos ofensivo, de mau gosto, insensato, mesmo vil e nojento. Esta é a nossa concepção de liberdade, a liberdade de dissídio, do dissent, que, como tudo no mundo, não nasceu da natureza mas de uma história cultural, política e civilizacional que cada um escolhe e deseja como quer. E eu quero esta, porque não tenho nada a aprender sobre a liberdade com a Síria e o Irão, com o Egipto e a Arábia Saudita, com o Hamas e o Hezbollah, com a "rua árabe", nem com aqueles que se "indignam" contra os desmandos do "Ocidente, porque são contra os EUA, ou contra a guerra no Afeganistão e no Iraque, contra Israel, e estão órfãos do mundo a preto e branco do comunismo, nas suas várias versões, mesmo as de Toni Negri e do Le Monde Diplomatique.

A maior das falácias é achar que é a religião que está no centro destes eventos (e se fosse? O que é que mudava?), mas claramente uma recusa política da democracia e uma recusa cultural da tolerância, da liberdade, das diferenças, e uma recusa social e cultural em viver em sociedades em que as mulheres não façam parte do património dos homens. Estes não são problemas que devamos interiorizar como sendo nossa culpa, são problemas do mundo árabe e persa, são problemas do islão. Enquanto as sociedades maioritariamente muçulmanas se recusarem a separar o Estado da religião, a tolerar as outras religiões e em particular o agnosticismo e o ateísmo, a tratar de outro modo as mulheres, estes problemas são problemas de poder e de conflito, uma guerra nas formas novas que tem hoje.


Esta é a chantagem que nos é feita e a que estamos a ceder. E se no fim disto tudo eu pedir ao PÚBLICO que ilustre o meu artigo com uma das caricaturas, uma das que penso ser absolutamente defensável como caricatura, a de Maomé com o turbante-bomba, o que é que acontece? É uma provocação gratuita? Não é, é a ilustração ideal para o que digo, não só pela imagem como sobre tudo o que ela suscita. Mas já se levantam todos os problemas, de autocensura, de risco, de pensar duas vezes. Nunca se sabe se alguém pega no PÚBLICO e o associa aos outros jornais "blasfemos" e me dita uma fatwa. É pouco provável, mas convém pensar duas vezes. E é nesse pensar duas vezes que está a autocensura, e a censura, e a efectiva diminuição das nossas liberdades.

Voltamos aos tempos de "mais vale vermelhos do que mortos", revistos agora para outra cor, para "mais vale verdes do que mortos". Ficam os muçulmanos ofendidos? Não deviam, porque têm sempre uma maneira de responder a esta situação: serem os primeiros a manifestar-se pela liberdade dos dinamarqueses, pelo seu direito de caricaturarem o profeta, como muitos cristãos marchariam, como cidadãos, pelo direito de se caricaturar a Igreja, o Papa e Deus, em nome da liberdade que prezam no "reino de César".

(No Público de hoje.)
Entry link: MAIS VALE VERDES DO QUE MORTOS

MAIS VALE VERDES DO QUE MORTOS

(Last edited: sábado, 11 fevereiro 2006, 7:15 )
16:00 (JPP)

MAIS VALE VERDES DO QUE MORTOS

Pacheco Pereira, Público, 8 Fev 2006

Eu pensei que as coisas estavam melhores do que o que estão, mas, mais uma vez, se percebe como há apenas uma fina película entre a civilização e a barbárie. Película que estamos a deixar romper com a maior das displicências. Devia desconfiar que é assim porque os sinais estão por todo o lado. Mas a gente acredita, quer acreditar, que algumas dezenas de anos de democracia consolidada (na maioria da Europa) e duas centenas de anos desde a revolução americana e francesa tinham consolidado a liberdade como princípio. Mas não é, não é suficiente, como se vê.

Estamos em guerra e estamos a perder. Estamos a perder, antes de tudo, porque ainda não percebemos que estamos em guerra. A retórica olimpiana, de um mundo "multicultural", de uma "comunidade internacional" eficaz, assente na lei e na Realpolitik moderada, ofusca-nos e impede-nos de ver o que está à nossa frente. Muitos sublimam as fraquezas, transformando-as num arremedo de "diplomacia" que não é senão contemporização e complacência, outros têm medo e estão dispostos à servidão, outros minimizam o que acontece para não quebrar o mundo ideal em que vivem.

Estamos a perder por dentro, o que é pior. A crise das caricaturas dinamarquesas é disso o melhor sinal. Mortos e feridos, atentados, violências, destruição de embaixadas, expulsão de estrangeiros, muitos deles os dadores de solidariedade, intolerância exaltada e absoluta, e nós, os visados, arrastamo-nos pela culpa. A UE gaguejou, no limite do pedido de desculpas, e Portugal, pela voz do ministro dos Negócios Estrangeiros, foi ainda mais longe do que o pedido de desculpas, condenou os caricaturistas e calou-se face à violência absurda e orquestrada que passa por ser "a rua árabe".

A comunicação social que costuma ser hiper-sensível à questão da liberdade de expressão, muitas vezes de forma puramente gratuita e corporativa, para encobrir os seus abusos, está numa de "respeito", de "contexto", de "bom senso", de "bom gosto". Encontram-se mil e um pretextos e mil e uma desculpas para se não ser claro: é o jornal dinamarquês que é dúplice e se recusou a caricaturar Cristo, é o jornal dinamarquês que é racista e antiárabe e encomendou as caricaturas de forma provocatória, é Sousa Lara, Abecasis, e as cenas à volta do filme sobre a Virgem Maria, é o abaixo-assinado contra a caricatura de António do Papa com o preservativo no nariz, é tudo e mais alguma coisa. Estamos a falar do mesmo? Quero lá saber se o jornal dinamarquês é respeitável, equilibrado, sensato, equidistante do islão e da cristandade, quero lá saber se o New York Times não passou as caricaturas, ou se a SIC e a RTP as mostraram veladas e à distância! O que eu quero saber é que se o valor da liberdade, e da sua forma especial, o da liberdade de expressão, não está em causa nestes eventos, então não sei o que é a liberdade.

Pergunta-se (sinistra pergunta nos dias de hoje, que mal se formula culpabiliza os dinamarqueses): é a liberdade de expressão absoluta? Não, não é. Tem limites na lei na democracia, tem regras mínimas, para proteger outras liberdades e outros direitos. Regras mínimas, aliás habitualmente violadas sem consequência, para proteger a dignidade dos indivíduos, a sua intimidade, a sua personalidade, o seu direito de não ser caluniado. Mas são regras para os indivíduos, não são nem para religiões, nem comunidades, nem crenças, nem para a "blasfémia". Mesmo assim, o abuso destes limites é comum, justificado pelo "interesse público", e é raríssimo ver a comunicação social a discutir tão voluntariamente os seus limites no "bom senso" e no "bom gosto", quanto mais no "respeito" e muito menos no "contexto". Ainda bem, vivemos com esta realidade, não é perfeita, mas é melhor do que o seu contrário. Por isso repito a mesma pergunta: é a liberdade de expressão absoluta neste caso? É. Ou é absoluta ou não é.

De novo, insisto, não quero saber se houve intenção de ofender (e depois?), de fazer propaganda anti-islão (e depois?), de ser simplista na representação do "martírio" (e depois?), de rebaixar Maomé (e depois?) de associar o islão ao terrorismo (e depois? É proibido?). É acaso proibido representar Deus-pai como um velho lúbrico como faz Vilhena e Crumb, e Cristo como um alegre imbecil como fizeram os Monty Python? É que se não é para defender este direito de se exprimir no limite das nossas crenças, a liberdade não serve para nada. É que também convém não esquecer que a nossa liberdade foi conquistada exactamente aqui, contra a intolerância religiosa. A essência da liberdade, tal como a entendemos, é a liberdade do outro, de escrever, desenhar, pintar, representar, filmar aquilo com que não concordamos, aquilo que consideramos ofensivo, de mau gosto, insensato, mesmo vil e nojento. Esta é a nossa concepção de liberdade, a liberdade de dissídio, do dissent, que, como tudo no mundo, não nasceu da natureza mas de uma história cultural, política e civilizacional que cada um escolhe e deseja como quer. E eu quero esta, porque não tenho nada a aprender sobre a liberdade com a Síria e o Irão, com o Egipto e a Arábia Saudita, com o Hamas e o Hezbollah, com a "rua árabe", nem com aqueles que se "indignam" contra os desmandos do "Ocidente, porque são contra os EUA, ou contra a guerra no Afeganistão e no Iraque, contra Israel, e estão órfãos do mundo a preto e branco do comunismo, nas suas várias versões, mesmo as de Toni Negri e do Le Monde Diplomatique.

A maior das falácias é achar que é a religião que está no centro destes eventos (e se fosse? O que é que mudava?), mas claramente uma recusa política da democracia e uma recusa cultural da tolerância, da liberdade, das diferenças, e uma recusa social e cultural em viver em sociedades em que as mulheres não façam parte do património dos homens. Estes não são problemas que devamos interiorizar como sendo nossa culpa, são problemas do mundo árabe e persa, são problemas do islão. Enquanto as sociedades maioritariamente muçulmanas se recusarem a separar o Estado da religião, a tolerar as outras religiões e em particular o agnosticismo e o ateísmo, a tratar de outro modo as mulheres, estes problemas são problemas de poder e de conflito, uma guerra nas formas novas que tem hoje.


Esta é a chantagem que nos é feita e a que estamos a ceder. E se no fim disto tudo eu pedir ao PÚBLICO que ilustre o meu artigo com uma das caricaturas, uma das que penso ser absolutamente defensável como caricatura, a de Maomé com o turbante-bomba, o que é que acontece? É uma provocação gratuita? Não é, é a ilustração ideal para o que digo, não só pela imagem como sobre tudo o que ela suscita. Mas já se levantam todos os problemas, de autocensura, de risco, de pensar duas vezes. Nunca se sabe se alguém pega no PÚBLICO e o associa aos outros jornais "blasfemos" e me dita uma fatwa. É pouco provável, mas convém pensar duas vezes. E é nesse pensar duas vezes que está a autocensura, e a censura, e a efectiva diminuição das nossas liberdades.

Voltamos aos tempos de "mais vale vermelhos do que mortos", revistos agora para outra cor, para "mais vale verdes do que mortos". Ficam os muçulmanos ofendidos? Não deviam, porque têm sempre uma maneira de responder a esta situação: serem os primeiros a manifestar-se pela liberdade dos dinamarqueses, pelo seu direito de caricaturarem o profeta, como muitos cristãos marchariam, como cidadãos, pelo direito de se caricaturar a Igreja, o Papa e Deus, em nome da liberdade que prezam no "reino de César".

(No Público de hoje.)
Entry link: MAIS VALE VERDES DO QUE MORTOS

MEMÓRIAS FELIZES DE ILUSTRES ALEXANDRINOS

(Last edited: domingo, 5 fevereiro 2006, 11:35 )
Público, 5 Fev 2006

Quatro ilustres ex-alunos do Alexandre Herculano
estiveram ontem a desfiar as suas recordações e afectos
do centenário liceu portuense. Histórias carregadas
de humor e ternura que contagiaram a sala.
POR NUNO CORVACHO

MEMÓRIAS FELIZES DE ILUSTRES ALEXANDRINOS

“Estamos todos muito mais
novos!” – o comentário de Rui
Vilar, ao dirigir-se àquela plateia
cheia de gente para cima
dos sessenta anos e preparada
para contar e ouvir contar
histórias do passado, podia ser
tomado por um exercício de ironia,
não fosse o caso de todos
eles terem ali rejuvenescido
de verdade. Não há, de facto,
outro nome a dar àquilo que
aconteceu ontem à tarde no
anfiteatro do liceu portuense
Alexandre Herculano, que
por estes dias comemora o
seu centésimo aniversário: o
bruá cúmplice das vozes, os
suspiros de contentamento, os
risos a abrirem-se num leque
furtivo e um inconfundível
desassossego juvenil a tomar
definitivamente conta da sala.
Como se aquele anfiteatro de cidadãos
grisalhos e respeitáveis,
ali reunido para comemorar a
memória da escola onde cada
um deles passara os seus irrepetíveis
anos de adolescência,
se tivesse magicamente transformado
numa sala de aula e
um qualquer professor estivesse
a ponto de reaparecer a
qualquer momento para repor
a ordem.
Alguns já lá não deviam estar
desde o tempo em que haviam
completado os seus estudos, décadas
atrás. Decerto já teriam
contado melancolicamente as
rugas e cabelos brancos uns
dos outros mas verificado
com ternura que a cintilação
nos olhares continuava igual.
Agora, porém, havia ali um
motivo especial para os circunstantes
redobrarem de
atenção. Estavam ali quatro
ilustres ex-alunos que tinham
sido chamados a desfiar as suas
memórias afectivas: além
do presidente da Fundação
Gulbenkian, Rui Vilar (que
disse ter andado no liceu “de
49 a 56 do século passado”), o
empresário Belmiro de Azevedo
(que lá entrou há 57 anos), o
cientista Sobrinho Simões (aluno
entre 57 e 64) e o economista
António Borges (o mais novo,
que saiu do liceu em 1967).
Já lá vão quase cinquenta
anos, mas Sobrinho Simões
lembra-se bem do dia em que
o pai o “largou” à porta do Alexandre
Herculano e lhe disse:
“E agora desenrasca-te!”. Ainda
habituado à pequena escola
33-A da Rua de Costa Cabral,
o rapazinho de dez anos logo
ficou impressionado com a
extensão dos corredores, a
altura das paredes e sobretudo
o “tamanho” dos colegas. “A D.
Maria da Graça, que foi a minha
professora na instrução
primária, tratava-nos por tu.
Ali, no liceu, éramos tratados
por ‘senhores’. Ora isso foi um
salto enorme!”.
Rui Vilar também não foi indiferente
àquele casarão “enorme
e solene” da Avenida de Camilo
e ao impacte dos cartazes
dissuasores que algum espírito
salazarista colocara em pontos
estratégicos do liceu com frases
tão edificantes como “No barulho
ninguém se entende, é por
isso que na revolução ninguém
se respeita” ou “Se soubesses
o que custa mandar, gostarias
de obedecer toda a vida”. Belmiro
de Azevedo chegou a ser
por um curto período chefe de
quina na Mocidade Portugue-
sa, mas, logo que pôde, meteuse
em actividades de xadrez
como desculpa para não usar
a farda. Já Vilar, animado da
mesma intenção, optou por se
inscrever em aulas de rádio,
tendo andado um ano inteiro
para construir um aparelho,
sem o conseguir.
Mas nenhum deles deixa de
reivindicar memórias estruturantes
do Alexandre Herculano.
Belmiro de Azevedo, por
exemplo, disse ter cimentado
por lá a ética de “tolerância
zero” que lhe conforma a vida
– “zero erros, zero mentiras” – e
ganho o gosto pela Matemática
que, para ele, é um instrumento
tão natural como “andar de
bicicleta”. António Borges vai
mais longe, ao considerar-se
“apaixonado” pela ciência dos
números, em grande parte por
influência de um professor, e
já não tanto pela parte musical,
cujas aulas de canto coral
eram um “verdadeiro fiasco”.
Rui Vilar recordou a influência
de Óscar Lopes (“que, apesar
de comunista, nos deu a ler
a Pátria Portuguesa, de Júlio
Dantas, por ser um livro bem
escrito”), a tertúlia Caminho,
que ele próprio e alguns colegas
fundaram e onde se discutiram
temas tão sisudos como a Música
de Beethoven e a Poesia
Romântica e Simbolista, bem
como as sessões do cineclube
liceal em que pela primeira vez
se viram filmes de Jacques Tati
e do neo-realismo italiano.
Para Sobrinho Simões, a
“rigidez curricular” do ensino
ministrado à época e a
prevalência da memorização
não foram obstáculo a que os
professores tivessem também
sabido “motivar” os alunos no
gosto pelo conhecimento. Se a
semente ficar, pode ser que se
cumpra a profecia avançada no
início da sessão pelo presidente
da Assembleia de Escola, José
Luís Sarmento: “Que daqui
a cinquenta anos possa um
sucessor meu ter a honra de
se dirigir a uma assembleia de
alexandrinos tão ilustre e tão
rica de exemplos como esta.
Quem sabe não estarão hoje
nas nossas salas de aula os
cientistas, empreendedores,
artistas, estadistas e filantropos
do futuro?

Tive um extraordinário professor de Matemática, um homem já com uma
certa idade, discreto e humilde. Despertava o interesse e fez com que eu
me apaixonasse pela Matemática. Se não fosse ele, eu teria de certeza
seguido uma carreira diferente.
No meu tempo, não havia raparigas no liceu. O ambiente era mais
sossegado. Havia menos concorrência. É que nestas idades elas são mais
produtivas...
ANTÓNIO BORGES
ECONOMISTA

Havia um rapaz gordo, simpático, o Vieira, que tinha um rosto
permanentemente sorridente. A certa altura, o Sena Esteves, que era o
professor de Química, achou que o miúdo estava a gozar com ele e deulhe
uma lambada. No dia seguinte, depois de se ter apercebido do erro,
deu-lhe um chocolatezinho com uma medalha e pediu-lhe desculpa.
Houve uma vez em que eu trepei pelo cano da água até à sala onde estava
a decorrer um exame de Desenho. Consegui fazer o teste no lugar de um
aluno que estava em dificuldades e ele acabou por ganhar o prémio.
BELMIRO DE AZEVEDO
PRESIDENTE DO GRUPO SONAE

Tínhamos um professor de Inglês, o José Luís Afonso, que passava a vida
a trabalhar nos seus dicionários e misturava permanentemente as duas
línguas. “Stop talking, meninos!”, dizia ele.
Em 53/54, cinco alunas começaram a frequentar o liceu que até então
era só de rapazes. Tinham um recreio em espaço próprio que logo foi
baptizado de “gineceu”. Aquelas raparigas inevitavelmente provocaram
por ali terramotos sentimentais...
RUI VILAR
PRESIDENTE DA FUNDAÇÃO GULBENKIAN

Nós éramos miúdos e, no início do liceu, éramos confrontados com coisas
que não conseguíamos interpretar muito bem. O meu colega Zé Marcelino
veio uma vez ter comigo para me dizer: “Já sei donde é que vêm as crianças!”.
“Donde?”, perguntei eu. “Do rabo”, disse ele.
Eu era muito mau a Canto Coral. E fiz uma prova tão ordinária que o
professor até pensou que eu tinha feito de propósito. De maneira
que ele acabou por me pôr juntamente com o coro. Mas, quando
percebeu o desastre que eu era, disse-me logo: “Bem, tu agora estás aí,
mas ficas calado!”.
SOBRINHO SIMÕES
INVESTIGADOR NA ÁREA DA MEDICINA
Entry link: MEMÓRIAS FELIZES DE ILUSTRES ALEXANDRINOS

BILL GATES EM MEDRÕES

(Last edited: domingo, 5 fevereiro 2006, 10:48 )
PÚBLICO • DOMINGO, 5 FEV 2006

António Barreto

No dia em que Bill Gates se
passeou por Lisboa, um
canal de televisão, não
recordo qual, decidiu fazer
uma breve reportagem em Trás-os-
Montes. Não sei se foi de propósito ou
por coincidência, mas foi apropriado. Os
jornalistas apresentaram-se em Medrões,
aldeia e freguesia do concelho de Santa
Marta de Penaguião, distrito de Vila Real.
Visitaram a escola primária que recebe,
pelo que se percebeu, duas a três dezenas
de crianças da localidade e da vizinhança.
Trata-se de escola tipicamente rural. Uma
senhora, mãe ou professora, informa que
a escola tem já banda larga. Mas os alunos
têm de se deslocar a pé, alguns a dois ou
três quilómetros, pois não há transporte
público, nem sequer municipal. Por
aqueles lados, para que se saiba, quando
faz frio... faz frio! E quando chove... chove!
A escola não tem facilidades para tomar
refeições, pelo que as crianças têm de ir a
casa almoçar e voltar para as aulas da tarde.
Para muitos, quatro percursos por dia,
cinco a dez quilómetros entre caminhos de
montanha e estrada nacional com curvas
e carros. O abastecimento de água faz-se a
partir de um poço, pelo que os alunos, por
precaução, levam consigo umas garrafas
de água potável. Soubemos também que
a escola, perto da estrada, não tem vedação
nem protecção. Segundo informa
a cidadã, quando sai uma bola fora do
recreio e cai na estrada, os miúdos, com
a imprevidência habitual, correm a apanhá-
la. Mas, motivo de orgulho, a escola
tem banda larga!

O PRESIDENTE DA CÂMARA DE SANTA
Marta de Penaguião foi interrogado sobre
o assunto. O homem falava com uma
arrogância inusitada. Não via riscos nenhuns
na ausência de vedação. Quanto
à água, nunca tinha havido problema.
Acrescentou que se esse era motivo de
reivindicação, “não havia problemas, a
Câmara ia trazer água da companhia”. E
asseverou que não haveria transportes
camarários, pois que a tanto não era obrigado!
A lei, disse, “só obriga a assegurar
transportes em distâncias superiores a
três quilómetros”. Sobre a possibilidade
de organização de uma cantina ou sala de
refeições, garantiu, com fastio, que “havia
planos”. Apesar de incomodado com estas
perguntas descabidas e estes problemas
menores, o autarca não escondia a sua satisfação
pela oportunidade de falar para a
televisão e mostrar a sua rústica soberba.
E tinha banda larga!

ENTRETANTO, NA CAPITAL, BILL GAtes
dava brilho ao carrossel organizado pelo
governo em volta dele. Deram-lhe uma
grã-cruz. Fez discursos e deu entrevistas.
Recebeu o presidente da União Europeia
Durão Barroso (disse bem, recebeu), que
não quis faltar ao beija-mão. Fez uma conferência.
Deu uma aula a jovens seleccionados.
Presidiu a um Fórum global. E, em
cerimónia pública, acolheu oito ministros
oito e um Primeiro-ministro um, com os
quais assinou dezoito protocolos de cooperação
dezoito. Por via destes, a sua
empresa vai associar-se à modernização
da Administração Pública, dos serviços
fiscais, da educação, da ciência e de tudo
o resto. Os beneficiados serão um milhão
de jovens um.

APESAR DE SABER QUE A BANDA
larga acontecerá de qualquer maneira,
com ou sem governo, o mesmo sucedendo
com os computadores e a informática em
geral, não nego a eventual bondade destes
planos. Ou antes: espero para ver. Se
resultarem, fico encantado. O que choca
é o frenesim do Governo, a sua obsessão
com a propaganda. Como já toda a gente
percebeu, tivemos, a coincidir com as eleições
presidenciais e com os respectivos
desaires governamentais, um turbilhão
de iniciativas e de cerimónias de pura
publicidade. Uma empresa que vai construir...
Um grupo que pensa fazer... Uma
multinacional que está disposta a encarar
a hipótese... Pessoas que querem “fazer
coisas”, como agora se diz... Boas ou más,
as promessas sucederam-se. Sempre com
ministros a correr e o primeiro-ministro
a saltar. Acordos de princípio, intenções,
ideias que ainda não são projectos,
projectos que ainda não são programas,
propósitos, promessas de investimento,
tudo serve para inaugurar, assinar e organizar
“eventos” solenes. Energia, ciência,
computadores, imobiliário, vacinas, móveis,
tudo contribui para montar o circo
do governo. A maior parte dos projectos
está incompleta, é ainda incerta, falta saber
quanto investimento vem e quanto o
governo oferece, mas nada disso incomoda.
Pormenores... Certo é que, deste modo,
podem fazer-se ainda, para cada projecto,
mais duas ou três inaugurações.

O “EVENTO” BILL GATES SUPEROU
evidentemente tudo e todos. Sempre era
o homem mais rico do planeta. Uma das
multinacionais mais poderosas do mundo.
O maior filantropo da história. Só me
pergunto qual seria o outro país europeu
que se submeteria a este circo e se envolveria
nesta cerimónia de propaganda
própria de atrasados.

ENTRETANTO, EM MEDRÕES, A EScola
primária tem banda larga, não tem
vedação, água, cantina ou transporte
para as crianças. A escola rural de Medrões
já não é típica de Portugal, o que
não justifica o estado em que se encontra.
As escolas rurais estão a desaparecer a
ritmo acelerado. Muitas vezes, em pior
situação estão as escolas dos subúrbios
das grandes cidades. O desenvolvimento
desigual é assim, sempre foi. Há sectores
e áreas de actividade onde as vanguardas
avançam e melhoram, deixando para trás
os atrasados, os mais pobres ou os mais
isolados. Sabemos que é assim e espera-se
que os adiantados sirvam de estímulo para
que os outros, por cópia e emulação, sigam
o exemplo. Isto é o que vem nos livros
e o que a realidade nos diz todos os dias.
Mas não deixa de ser chocante que as autoridades,
os responsáveis pelas políticas
públicas, se entreguem sistematicamente,
com volúpia e exibicionismo, a preferir o
vistoso e a investir no que parece moderno.
E que sejam as próprias autoridades
a cavar o foço da desigualdade.

COM OU SEM BANDA LARGA, UM PAÍS
deveria ter bem mais orgulho nas suas
escolas aquecidas no Inverno, nos seus
transportes escolares, na água potável
nas escolas, nas cantinas para estudantes.
Para já não falar de alunos que tenham
positiva em matemática, que aprendam
português e que saibam escrever. Ou que
não passem quatro horas por dia diante da
televisão e três na Internet. Ao apetrechar
as escolas de equipamentos e materiais
pedagógicos indispensáveis, o governo e
as autarquias estão apenas e exclusivamente
a cumprir o seu dever. Nada mais.
E não o cumprem quando não fornecem
água quente, aquecimento, transportes
ou cantinas. Nada mais simples. Por que
deveríamos ficar excitados quando as
autoridades dão foros de generosidade
e de visão estratégica aos seus próprios
actos de cumprimento do dever? E por
que são tratados de pessimistas todos os
que justamente mostram que as mesmas
autoridades não cumprem deveres bem
mais simples, mas menos vistosos?

O ESTADO E AS AUTARQUIAS NÃO
cumprem os seus deveres quando deixam
as médias dos exames de Matemática, Português,
Física e outras baixar a medíocres
profundezas. E não cumprem os seus deveres
quando não conseguem examinar
e reformar os programas, os professores
e os métodos de ensino da matemática.
Como os não cumprem quando deixaram
desenvolver-se um enorme e monstruoso
universo, o dos manuais escolares, onde
proliferam erros e disparates. Ah! Como
eu desejaria viver num país que se sentisse
orgulhoso das suas escolas confortáveis,
das suas crianças a falar e escrever
um português decente, dos seus jovens
a perceber o essencial da Matemática e
dos seus manuais escolares rigorosos e
adequados! Quanto eu gostaria que o meu
país não ficasse deste modo encandeado
com as lentejoulas e o pechisbeque! Como
seria bom que o governo do meu país cumprisse,
em silêncio, o seu dever! ?
Entry link: BILL GATES EM MEDRÕES


Page:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  (Next)
  ALL